Homeless Resource Center Success Criteria

As part of the Collective Impact process, 16 success criteria were established to help guide location, design, and service needs in future resource centers.

Salt Lake City and the Homeless Resource Site Evaluation Commission will use the established criteria to score potential sites for new homeless resource centers. Potential sites will also be initially scored based on zoning concerns, and environmental hazards including fault lines, flood planes, industrial hazards, areas of height and noise restriction.


Not conducive for regional drug trade, safety is key

The Salt Lake City Police Department has determined that proximity to interstate on- and off-ramps is an indicator in local drug activity. Potential resource center sites will be scored based on how close they are to on- and off-ramps in Salt Lake City.


Includes easy access to: shelter, day services, medical, behavioral health, detox, community partners, space for pets, storage, hot box (decontaminate clothing and personal belongings)

While resource centers will have many treatment services inside the facility, potential sites will be scored on their accessibility to existing, and future known services, both in terms of physical proximity and ease of transit.


Design for safety using Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design standards (CPTED)

CPTED is a multi-disciplinary approach to designing physical space in a manner that deters criminal behavior. Potential sites will be scored on environmental qualities such as clear site lines, lighting, and good visibility from the street and building.


Close to public transportation as appropriate to access needed services

Transportation is a major hurdle to treatment for many individuals experiencing homelessness. Potential sites will be scored based on their proximity to public transportation, which is defined as half a mile from TRAX stops and frequent bus lines.


Space for 24/7 occupation

New resource centers will provide space for individuals to stay in the facility at all hours of the day. Potential sites will be scored on available acreage size to accommodate 24-hour operation.


Design to affirm innate human dignity

This criteria relates to general building design. Plans will be reviewed to ensure elements such as good lighting, outdoor and open space are included to create a welcoming and safe feeling.


Site to include office space for intake and caseworkers

In order to eliminate hurdles to treatment, new resource centers will be designed with space available for treatment services. Potential sites will be scored on available acreage to accommodate service partners.


Flexibility to accommodate systematic development and changing needs of homeless population

This criteria relates to building design. Internal and external space design will be reviewed to ensure available space can easily be modified to accommodate new best practices in service and treatment.


Well-designed building and site.

This criteria relates to building design. New resource center building designs will be reviewed to ensure they not only fit within the character of the surrounding neighborhoods, but add to the overall character of the neighborhood. Aspects such as LEED Certification must also be included in design.


Has community, not institutional feel, aesthetically pleasing

This criteria relates to building design. New resource center building designs will be reviewed to ensure they include welcoming design elements such ground floor windows, porches, and good landscaping.


Internalized services, no public queuing

New resource centers will provide internal (off-street) waiting areas for those seeking treatment. Potential sites will be scored on available acreage to accommodate space for internal waiting areas.


Utilize technology to better serve

This criteria relates to service. Services available at new resource centers will utilize technology, such as bar coded IDs, to track individuals and treatment, while also providing for additional security.


Appropriate for sub-populations to be serviced

New resource centers will provide separate space for individual sub populations, such as single women. Potential sites will be scored on available acreage to accommodate space needs.


Integrated into surrounding area

New resource centers will be designed to neighborhood scale. Potential sites will be scored based on zoning for both needed acreage and building size, considering factors such building height.


Includes outdoor gathering space

Because new resource centers will be open for 24-hour use, they must include space for individual to gather outdoors while staying in the center. Potential sites will be scored on available acreage to accommodate outdoor space.


Part of larger neighborhood

Resource centers will be a home for individuals experiencing homelessness and should be built in areas conducive to multi-family residential living. Potential sites will be scored on residential livability factors, including proximity to grocery stores, and day-to-day services all city residents.